The Night Stalker
What are your thoughts on the Body on Somerton Beach case? I've become really intrigued by its mysteriousness.

My personal thoughts on this case was that he was probably MI 6, British secret service foreign office. I love this case, it is one of my favorites.

Do I have to feel bad for having a huge interest in the somewhat sick, twisted minds and thoughts of serial killers? I mean I don't have a positive feeling about it, it's more like I'm horror-struck or something but yeah ... I hope you know what I mean.

It’s human nature to want to understand these predators. Curiosity to understand extremes is normal. Raping, killing and eating people is not normal. But it is understandable you would want to know why people do these things.

killer-junction:

Donald “Pee-Wee” Gaskins - Child Serial Killer
The Trouble Trio:
At the garage where Gaskins worked part-time, he met two boys, Danny and Marsh, both close to his age and out of school. The three teamed up and named themselves the “The Trouble Trio.” The trio began burglarizing homes and picking up prostitutes in nearby cities. Locally they sometimes raped young boys, then threatened them so they would not tell the police.
Early Criminal Behavior:
The trio stopped their sexual rampage after being caught for gang-raping Marsh’s younger sister. As punishment, their parents bound and beat the boys until they bled. After the beatings, Marsh and Danny left the area and Gaskins continued breaking into homes alone. In 1946, at the age of 13, a girl he knew interrupted him burglarizing a home. She attacked him with an ax, which he managed to get away from her, striking her in the head and arm with it before running away from the scene.


Gaskins ‘Serious Murders’ Begin:
Victims of his serious murders included his 15-year-old niece, Janice Kirby, and her friend, Patricia Alsobrook. In November 1970, he offered the two girls a ride home from a bar and instead drove them to an abandoned house. There he raped, beat, and drowned the girls in separate locations. His next serious murder was of Martha Dicks, a 20-year-old who was attracted to Gaskins and hung around him at his part-time job at a car repair shop. She was also the first African American that he killed.


Peggy Cuttino:
In an attempt to stay out of the electric chair, Gaskins began confessing to other murders, which if true, would make him the worst killer in the history of South Carolina. One crime he admitted to was that of 13-year-old Peggy Cuttino, daughter of a prominent family. Prosecutors had already prosecuted William Pierce for the crime and sentenced him to life in prison. Prosecutors claimed Gaskins’ confession to the girl’s murder was simply for publicity and his confession was rejected.

killer-junction:

Donald “Pee-Wee” Gaskins - Child Serial Killer

The Trouble Trio:

At the garage where Gaskins worked part-time, he met two boys, Danny and Marsh, both close to his age and out of school. The three teamed up and named themselves the “The Trouble Trio.” The trio began burglarizing homes and picking up prostitutes in nearby cities. Locally they sometimes raped young boys, then threatened them so they would not tell the police.

Early Criminal Behavior:

The trio stopped their sexual rampage after being caught for gang-raping Marsh’s younger sister. As punishment, their parents bound and beat the boys until they bled. After the beatings, Marsh and Danny left the area and Gaskins continued breaking into homes alone. In 1946, at the age of 13, a girl he knew interrupted him burglarizing a home. She attacked him with an ax, which he managed to get away from her, striking her in the head and arm with it before running away from the scene.

Gaskins ‘Serious Murders’ Begin:

Victims of his serious murders included his 15-year-old niece, Janice Kirby, and her friend, Patricia Alsobrook. In November 1970, he offered the two girls a ride home from a bar and instead drove them to an abandoned house. There he raped, beat, and drowned the girls in separate locations. His next serious murder was of Martha Dicks, a 20-year-old who was attracted to Gaskins and hung around him at his part-time job at a car repair shop. She was also the first African American that he killed.

Peggy Cuttino:

In an attempt to stay out of the electric chair, Gaskins began confessing to other murders, which if true, would make him the worst killer in the history of South Carolina. One crime he admitted to was that of 13-year-old Peggy Cuttino, daughter of a prominent family. Prosecutors had already prosecuted William Pierce for the crime and sentenced him to life in prison. Prosecutors claimed Gaskins’ confession to the girl’s murder was simply for publicity and his confession was rejected.
geins:

Jeffrey Dahmer’s confession - Milwaukee Police DepartmentInterview with Patrick Kennedy (detective) and Dennis Murphy (detective), 1991
Q: So, Mr. Dahmer, how did you go about disposing of your victims?
Dahmer: Well, I’d just drag the body into the bathtub.
Dahmer hesitated for a moment, lost in thought, as if he was reliving the experience all over again.
Q: Go on, then what happened?
Dahmer: First, I’d strip off all the clothes on the body. Then, I took off my clothes too so they wouldn’t get dirty. I’d get in the tub too.
The detective nodded his head, indicating that he was listening intently.
Dahmer: I’d use a sharp knife, a very sharp knife. For something like this, it has to be very sharp.
Again the detective nodded, as if he understood perfectly the problems of cutting up bodies with something less than suitable instruments.
Dahmer: I’d start at the top of the chest and cut all the way down.Then I’d spread it open and remove all the—
Q: Wait a minute. Slow down. What do you mean you’d spread—
Dahmer: You know, I’d peel the skin and muscle back. That way I could scoop out all the stuff inside.
Dahmer just looked dreamy-eyed, sitting there talking about butchering a body as easily as preparing a chicken for the barbecue.
Dahmer: I’d cut up all the organs and put them into plastic bags. Each piece would be about the size of my fist. [He held out his hand to show the detective what he meant]
Q: Okay [the detective summarized]. So you were saying that it took about five bags for each body. Tell me, what were you feeling or thinking about during all this? I mean, you know—
Dahmer: Um. It’s all kind of exciting. [Dahmer thought for a moment] But I was also scared. I didn’t want to get caught and this was the most dangerous time.
Q: Yes…
Dahmer: I also felt this intense loss as I threw the bags into the garbage. At one time, these bags of body parts were a human being with a whole life in front of him. Now they were nothing but garbage. A complete waste.

geins:

Jeffrey Dahmer’s confession - Milwaukee Police Department
Interview with Patrick Kennedy (detective) and Dennis Murphy (detective), 1991


Q: So, Mr. Dahmer, how did you go about disposing of your victims?

Dahmer: Well, I’d just drag the body into the bathtub.

Dahmer hesitated for a moment, lost in thought, as if he was reliving the experience all over again.

Q: Go on, then what happened?

Dahmer: First, I’d strip off all the clothes on the body. Then, I took off my clothes too so they wouldn’t get dirty. I’d get in the tub too.

The detective nodded his head, indicating that he was listening intently.

Dahmer: I’d use a sharp knife, a very sharp knife. For something like this, it has to be very sharp.

Again the detective nodded, as if he understood perfectly the problems of cutting up bodies with something less than suitable instruments.

Dahmer: I’d start at the top of the chest and cut all the way down.Then I’d spread it open and remove all the—

Q: Wait a minute. Slow down. What do you mean you’d spread—

Dahmer: You know, I’d peel the skin and muscle back. That way I could scoop out all the stuff inside.

Dahmer just looked dreamy-eyed, sitting there talking about butchering a body as easily as preparing a chicken for the barbecue.

Dahmer: I’d cut up all the organs and put them into plastic bags. Each piece would be about the size of my fist. [He held out his hand to show the detective what he meant]

Q: Okay [the detective summarized]. So you were saying that it took about five bags for each body. Tell me, what were you feeling or thinking about during all this? I mean, you know—

Dahmer: Um. It’s all kind of exciting. [Dahmer thought for a moment] But I was also scared. I didn’t want to get caught and this was the most dangerous time.

Q: Yes…

Dahmer: I also felt this intense loss as I threw the bags into the garbage. At one time, these bags of body parts were a human being with a whole life in front of him. Now they were nothing but garbage. A complete waste.

true-crime-101:

Joachim Kroll was a German serial killer and cannibal. He was known as the Ruhr Cannibal (Ruhrkannibale), and the Duisburg Man-Eater (Duisburger Menschenfresser). He was convicted of eight murders but confessed to a total of 13.
Born the son of a miner in Hindenburg, a town in Upper Silesia (then Germany, now Poland), Kroll was the last among eight children. He was a weak child and used to wet the bed. His education was poor. (Later psychiatrists found he had an IQ of 76.)
After the end of World War II, Kroll’s family moved to North Rhine-Westphalia. He began killing in 1955, after his mother died. Around 1960, Kroll went to Duisburg to find work as a toilet attendant for Mannesmann. Afterwards he worked for Thyssen Industries and went to Laar, a district of Duisburg. At that time he resumed killing people.
On July 3, 1976, Kroll was arrested for kidnapping and killing a four-year-old girl named Marion Ketter. As police went from home to home, a neighbor approached a policeman and told him that the waste-pipe in his apartment building had blocked up, and when he had asked his neighbor, Kroll, whether he knew what had been blocking the pipe, Kroll had simply replied; “Guts”. Upon this report, the police went up to Kroll’s apartment and found the body of the Ketter girl cut up: some parts were in the fridge, a hand was cooking in a pan of boiling water and the intestines were found stuck in the waste-pipe.
Kroll was immediately arrested. He admitted killing Marion Ketter and gave details of 12 other murders and one attempted murder over the last two decades. 

true-crime-101:

Joachim Kroll was a German serial killer and cannibal. He was known as the Ruhr Cannibal (Ruhrkannibale), and the Duisburg Man-Eater (Duisburger Menschenfresser). He was convicted of eight murders but confessed to a total of 13.

Born the son of a miner in Hindenburg, a town in Upper Silesia (then Germany, now Poland), Kroll was the last among eight children. He was a weak child and used to wet the bed. His education was poor. (Later psychiatrists found he had an IQ of 76.)

After the end of World War II, Kroll’s family moved to North Rhine-Westphalia. He began killing in 1955, after his mother died. Around 1960, Kroll went to Duisburg to find work as a toilet attendant for Mannesmann. Afterwards he worked for Thyssen Industries and went to Laar, a district of Duisburg. At that time he resumed killing people.

On July 3, 1976, Kroll was arrested for kidnapping and killing a four-year-old girl named Marion Ketter. As police went from home to home, a neighbor approached a policeman and told him that the waste-pipe in his apartment building had blocked up, and when he had asked his neighbor, Kroll, whether he knew what had been blocking the pipe, Kroll had simply replied; “Guts”. Upon this report, the police went up to Kroll’s apartment and found the body of the Ketter girl cut up: some parts were in the fridge, a hand was cooking in a pan of boiling water and the intestines were found stuck in the waste-pipe.

Kroll was immediately arrested. He admitted killing Marion Ketter and gave details of 12 other murders and one attempted murder over the last two decades. 

true-crime-101:

Maria Gruber, Irene Leidolf, Stephanija Meyer, and Waltraud Wagner made up one of the most unusual crime teams in 20th Century Europe. The four Austrian women were nurses working at Lainz General Hospital in Vienna, and together murdered scores of patients.
Wagner, 23, was the first to kill a patient with an overdose of morphine. She recruited Gruber, 19, and Leidolf, 21, and eventually the “house mother” of the group, 43-year-old Stephanija Mayer.
However, lethal injection didn’t provide enough excitement, and soon the self-styled “death pavilion” had invented their own murder method: while one held the victim’s head and pinched their nose, another would pour water into the victim’s mouth until they drowned in their bed. Since elderly patients frequently had fluid in their lungs, it was an unprovable crime.
They were caught after they were overheard bragging about their latest murder at a local tavern. They confessed to 49 murders, but may have been responsible for as many as 200.

true-crime-101:

Maria Gruber, Irene Leidolf, Stephanija Meyer, and Waltraud Wagner made up one of the most unusual crime teams in 20th Century Europe. The four Austrian women were nurses working at Lainz General Hospital in Vienna, and together murdered scores of patients.

Wagner, 23, was the first to kill a patient with an overdose of morphine. She recruited Gruber, 19, and Leidolf, 21, and eventually the “house mother” of the group, 43-year-old Stephanija Mayer.

However, lethal injection didn’t provide enough excitement, and soon the self-styled “death pavilion” had invented their own murder method: while one held the victim’s head and pinched their nose, another would pour water into the victim’s mouth until they drowned in their bed. Since elderly patients frequently had fluid in their lungs, it was an unprovable crime.

They were caught after they were overheard bragging about their latest murder at a local tavern. They confessed to 49 murders, but may have been responsible for as many as 200.

The grizzly deeds of the Sausage King of Chicago, Adolph Luetgert. A ghost investigation at Flounder’s bar in Chicago, IL. Blood, murder and sausage.

John Wayne Gacy’s 19th victim finally identified.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/11/29/justice/illinois-gacy-victim/index.html?eref=mrss_igoogle_cnn

CHICAGO (CNN) — Laura O’Leary was a teenager when her 19-year-old brother disappeared in 1976, but she long suspected what had happened to him. She just couldn’t prove it.

More than three decades later, DNA tests confirmed her suspicions, authorities in Chicago announced Tuesday. William George “Bill” Bundy fell victim to serial killer John Wayne Gacy, the “killer clown” who murdered nearly three dozen young men and boys before police discovered the crude cemetery beneath his home in 1978.

Bundy’s remains had been identified only as “Victim 19” until mid-November, when genetic testing confirmed his identity, Cook County Sheriff Thomas Dart said. Bundy is the first of eight long-nameless Gacy victims to be identified in an effort launched in October.

"I remember him leaving that one night, saying he was going to go to a party," O’Leary told reporters Tuesday. "And that was the last time I saw him."

Bundy had been a diver and gymnast in high school, said O’Leary, who was 17 at the time he disappeared.

"All my girlfriends wanted to date him. They didn’t come over for me, only for him," she said.

Police began hauling bodies out of Gacy’s crawl space in December 1978. O’Leary said she began to think her brother’s was one of them after she learned that Gacy had been a construction contractor. Bundy had just gotten a job with a contractor and had talked about how he was learning to be an electrician.

"My mother was pretty much in denial, but I made her go to the dentist," O’Leary said. But their dentist had retired, and his records had been destroyed.

"Without DNA back then, there was nothing I could really do," she said. But DNA samples from O’Leary and her brother, Robert Bundy, matched the remains, Dart said. Both their parents are now deceased, O’Leary said.

Gacy, a part-time party clown, was put to death in 1994 for the killings of 33 boys and young men between 1972 and 1978. “Victim 19” was believed to have been between 17 and 21 years old and between 5-foot-1 and 5-foot-6, investigators said.

Bundy, at 5-foot-5, was the shortest of Gacy’s victims and in the same age range, Dart said. In addition to the DNA testing, Dart said a friend of Bundy’s also came forward to describe him showing off a wallet full of cash from his new construction job. Gacy had used the promise of work as one way of luring his victims, along with posing as a police officer or picking up runaways.

O’Leary said her family filed a missing-person report when Bundy failed to come home in 1976, but “it wasn’t handled aggressively.” Dart said the original report has not yet been located.

At the time, “missing-persons cases were not given very much thought and certainly were not professionally handled,” Dart acknowledged.

Investigators are still pursuing 80 other possible leads regarding the seven remaining unidentified victims, he said. While Bundy’s family finally knows what happened to him, four other families who have stepped forward as possible relatives of other victims have been ruled out by DNA tests.

"There’s nothing fortunate about being a victim in this case, but these families were looking for closure, and we were unable to provide that," he said.

A sample of Gacy’s blood discovered among the case evidence has been submitted to a Justice Department database of DNA samples, but Dart said his office had no indication that Gacy had victims in other states.

"We’re not trying to lead people to believe we have any specific leads on anything in that nature,” he said. "It is a tool that is commonly used by law enforcement, and it is something that needs to be done."

serial-killers-101:

Elmer Wayne Henley, Jr. is a convicted American serial killer, incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) system. Henley was sentenced to six consecutive life sentences on July 16, 1974 for his role in a series of murders in Houston, Texas, in which a minimum of twenty-eight teenage boys were abducted, raped and murdered byDean Corll between 1970 and 1973. Many of the victims were lured to Corll’s home by Henley or Corll’s other teenage accomplice, David Brooks. Dean Corll, the ring-leader of the murders, was shot dead by Henley, then 17-years-old, on August 8, 1973.
Henley is serving six life sentences as a result of his involvement in the murders, at that time considered the deadliest case of serial murders in American history.

serial-killers-101:

Elmer Wayne Henley, Jr. is a convicted American serial killer, incarcerated in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) system. Henley was sentenced to six consecutive life sentences on July 16, 1974 for his role in a series of murders in Houston, Texas, in which a minimum of twenty-eight teenage boys were abducted, raped and murdered byDean Corll between 1970 and 1973. Many of the victims were lured to Corll’s home by Henley or Corll’s other teenage accomplice, David Brooks. Dean Corll, the ring-leader of the murders, was shot dead by Henley, then 17-years-old, on August 8, 1973.

Henley is serving six life sentences as a result of his involvement in the murders, at that time considered the deadliest case of serial murders in American history.

serial-killers-101:

Genene Jones (b. 1950) was a paediatric nurse who worked in several medical clinics around San Antonio, Texas, and is thought to have killed somewhere between 11 and 46 infants and children who were in her care (around 1980-1982). She used injections of heparin and later of succinylcholine to kill the babies. Novel succinylcholine detection methods were used to prove her guilt.
An accurate number may never be known, in part because after her conviction on one count of murder and one count of attempted murder, hospital officials throughout Texas shredded records of her employment and activities, preventing further trials and embarrassment.
In 1985 Jones was charged with two crimes and sentenced to 99 years in prison. Jones will serve only one-third of her sentence because of a law in place at the time to deal with prison overcrowding. Jones will receive automatic parole in 2017, much to the protest of the family of Chelsea McClellan, the child Jones was convicted of murdering.
Jones is eligible for parole every two to three years, having been denied six times so far.

serial-killers-101:

Genene Jones (b. 1950) was a paediatric nurse who worked in several medical clinics around San Antonio, Texas, and is thought to have killed somewhere between 11 and 46 infants and children who were in her care (around 1980-1982). She used injections of heparin and later of succinylcholine to kill the babies. Novel succinylcholine detection methods were used to prove her guilt.

An accurate number may never be known, in part because after her conviction on one count of murder and one count of attempted murder, hospital officials throughout Texas shredded records of her employment and activities, preventing further trials and embarrassment.

In 1985 Jones was charged with two crimes and sentenced to 99 years in prison. Jones will serve only one-third of her sentence because of a law in place at the time to deal with prison overcrowding. Jones will receive automatic parole in 2017, much to the protest of the family of Chelsea McClellan, the child Jones was convicted of murdering.

Jones is eligible for parole every two to three years, having been denied six times so far.